All posts by Stephen Darlington

ShareEverywhere

ShareEverwhere main screen
ShareEverwhere main screen

I was so busy when it came out that I never quite got around to blogging about it here: I have a new app out! It’s called ShareEverywhere. It is built exclusively for iOS 8 and uses the new, built-in “share” functionality, allowing you to share to a good number of services from any app that uses the standard share button.

When I first wrote it, I wasn’t sure how many, if any, developers would build share widgets into their apps. Now that we know the answer is “a lot of them,” I still use ShareEverywhere because it beats having a dozen widgets hiding in your action menu. And there are still services, like Pinboard.in, that don’t have their own native apps.

It’s available now in the App Store for your iPhone or iPad. It costs £1.49, $1.99, €1.79 or your local equivalent.

How do I do “X” in Swift?

Maybe I have some duff feeds in my RSS reader. Maybe I have a few poor choices of people that I follow on Twitter. But I see links along these lines all the time:

How do you do something in Swift?

The answer is, almost always, exactly the same way you’d do it in Objective-C!

You want to do pull-to-refresh? Same.

You want to play with location services? Same.

You want to display one of the new UIAlertControllers? That’s the same, too.

Why? Because they’re all part of the underlying framework, the framework that’s there whichever language you’re using. That includes both Apple-languages — Swift and Objective-C — and everything else, C#, Python, Ruby.

That’s not to say that there is nothing useful to write about Swift. As a new language there are lots of things to write about, new ways of structuring your code, better ways of implementing algorithms. Tricks to avoid common errors or pitfalls. But interfacing with the OS? The syntax changes slightly but the code is pretty much the same.